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I hope you’ll never have to tell a story like this, when you get to be 87.  I hope you’ll never have to do it.

 ― Marine veteran of the 1945 Battle of Iwo Jima, to his teenage interviewer

Ralph Leinoff, a Marine who fought at the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II, stands in front of the drawing he modeled after Joseph Rosenthal's iconic photograph of five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the American flag atop Mount Suribachi. (Portrait by Erica Miller, courtesy the Saratogian)

Ralph Leinoff, a Marine who fought at the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II, stands in front of the drawing he modeled after Joseph Rosenthal’s iconic photograph of five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the American flag atop Mount Suribachi. (Portrait by Erica Miller, courtesy the Saratogian)

Last night I did my first public reading from the book, The Things Our Fathers Saw. The turnout was great for a lovely summer evening, and I was especially gratified to meet the extended family of one of the book’s main narrators, Iwo Jima veteran Ralph Leinoff.

Ralph loved people, and he spent much time sharing his story with our young people especially. He did not like to get into the grit and the gore, but he told enough to  show why this history should not be forgotten. In fact, his quote above is the lede for the book on the back cover, and interior.

Here is the story, from the book,  of how he came to draw the iconic photograph that he witnessed, right there in the thick of the battle for Iwo Jima, where 7000 US Marines would fall, including many of his friends.

***

Now we were about two miles up from Mount Suribachi, where the flag was raised. We were put into a reserve position until we could get manpower; other units took over the front line, and we were put on reserve. While I was up on the airfield, I could see the mountain; I thought I spotted a little fleck of color up there at the top. I was like, ‘What the hell is that?’—because you were still seeing smoke coming up. We didn’t think that they had gotten up there. And I borrowed one of the officer’s field glasses, I took a look and I said, ‘Son of a gun, there’s an American flag flying—they’re up there!’ But what happened was they bypassed a lot of pillboxes to get up there, they got up there as fast as they could. They took a tremendous beating going up, and they went by a lot of Japanese machine gunners and all.

 

In his enthusiasm to be a Marine, Ralph had joined up although he was still technically a member of the New York State Guard. He recalled mail call on Iwo Jima.

 They brought up some fresh food, water and supplies and even brought up mail. At about two weeks into the operation, one of the letters I got was a postcard from the New York State Guard, threatening me with a court martial because I had been missing the drills. So I told my sergeant, I said, ‘Sergeant, I’m sorry to tell you this but I have to get back. I’m missing the drills in the New York State Guard. They want me back there.’ [chuckling] He said, ‘Get back to your foxhole.’ [He laughs again] So it was kind of a comical relief.

Flag raising on Iwo Jima. Joe Rosenthal, Associated Press, February 23, 1945. 80-G-413988.

Flag raising on Iwo Jima. Joe Rosenthal, Associated Press, February 23, 1945. 80-G-413988.

So anyway, we started to get mail, and one of the things I got that was distributed by the Navy was a little small edition of Time Magazine. And as I sat there eating a sandwich I was going through this small magazine, and I came upon the picture, the [now famous] photograph—it was all black and white, no color. I said, ‘Son of a—look at this silhouette! There’s six guys here trying to raise the flag on Mount Suribachi!’ So I started drawing. We had nothing else to do; we were in reserve until we got up there to the airfield. I had letterhead, I had a pencil, and so on—I was drawing it! And I kept the drawing, and finally when we got back to our base in Maui, I was serious. I said, ‘I’m going to go get some paper and some paint—some watercolors’. At that time it just came out, nobody really knew [how iconic the picture would become]. The paintings that the artists made afterward with the oil, of course, were much superior. I’m not a professional artist, but yes, I used to try to paint pictures of some of the men who were killed. I would try to make a picture and send it home to the family. I didn’t do too many, because some of the letters I got back in appreciation were really heartbreaking…and they wanted to know the ‘when, how, and why’; they wanted all the details how the men got killed, and well it’s… [pauses a short while] War is hell, it really is, and if you try to describe it, it just—it just can’t be done, can’t be done.

 

*************************************************************

Matthew Rozell’s career as a history teacher is now spanning four decades. Over the course of the past 20 years, he and his students conducted hundreds of interviews with the World War II generation. One such interview led to the reuniting of a train transport of Holocaust survivors with their American liberators, over 60 years later. He is currently working on a trilogy of narrative histories based on these interviews.

His first book, a narrative of World War II in the Pacific as told through the previously unpublished recollections of over 30 veterans, was released in August. It is available here.  His second book, in progress, is on the power of  teaching, remembering the Holocaust, and the real story behind the  iconic photo of the “Train Near Magdeburg’. He can be reached at his Facebook page at Author Matthew Rozell or by commenting below.

 

Excerpt from the new book “The Things Our Fathers Saw” and Joe Minder’s prisoner of war dairy, dated 70 years ago this weekend, on the day he tasted freedom.

[In mid-August] On the radio the Japanese Emperor Hirohito spoke to his people and said, ‘The time has come when we must bear the unbearable.’ It was the first time they had heard his voice. Shaken prison camp commandants awaited word of whether or not to carry out the “kill-all” order within their camps.

Joe Minder recorded his observations as the prisoners dared to hope that their redemption was near.

 

Joseph  Minder 1941.

Joseph Minder 1941.

August 15, 1945
Heavy bombing near here all last night. Terrific explosions. 12:00 AM: All Japs went to town. We didn’t go to work until 3 PM—something is darn funny around here. Guards are very quiet today.
August 16, 1945
Many peace rumors floating around camp today.
August 17, 1945
Australian officers received paper written in Japanese. They say the war is over from what they could interpret in the paper.
August 18, 1945
Worked in garden near camp a half day. Heard loudspeakers blaring away downtown.
August 19, 1945
Camp commander announced we would not work in the mine any more. War must be over?
August 20, 1945
War’s end was officially announced by interpreter, ‘Mosiki’ at 1:15 PM! Still hard to believe!
August 21, 1945
Four prisoners who escaped from camp June 18 returned and were turned loose with us. They told us of the horrible brutal treatment they received after being captured by Japs.

Now, the moment of liberation was at hand. It would stay in the ex-prisoners’ minds for the rest of their lives.
August 22, 1945
After 3½ years of starvation and brutal treatment, that beautiful symbol of freedom once more flies over our head! Our camp tailor worked all night and finished our first American flag! The blue came from a GI barracks bag, red from a Jap comforter and the white from an Australian bed sheet. When I came out of the barracks and saw those beautiful colors for the first time I felt like crying!
I know now, like I never did before, what it means to be able to live in a peaceful nation like the U.S.A. with its unlimited amount of liberties and freedom!

Japs increased our chow. An 800 lb. bull was brought in camp. Had fried fish and fried greens and fried tomatoes, also a level bowl of barley/soya bean/ thick blood soup for supper.

*****

IMGI will be doing my first reading Sunday Aug. 23rd from “The Things Our Fathers Saw” and offering signed copies of book, in person.

290 action-packed pages. And all true. But ONLY 70 SEATS in the house so get there EARLY if you were planning to come out!

• BOOK SIGNING AND TALK-Sunday, August 23, 7:00 pm:
The Glen at Hiland Meadows, 39 Longview Drive, Queensbury, NY 12804

Upcoming events page: http://matthewrozell.com/author-appearances/

Order the signed book directly: http://matthewrozell.com/order-the-things-our-fathers-saw/

Order paperback or ebook from Amazon:

******

 

I’m not sure what this is. It leaves some things out, I think. Read the book and decide for yourself.

 

Statement by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

Cabinet Decision

On the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, we must calmly reflect upon the road to war, the path we have taken since it ended, and the era of the 20th century. We must learn from the lessons of history the wisdom for our future.

More than one hundred years ago, vast colonies possessed mainly by the Western powers stretched out across the world. With their overwhelming supremacy in technology, waves of colonial rule surged toward Asia in the 19th century. There is no doubt that the resultant sense of crisis drove Japan forward to achieve modernization. Japan built a constitutional government earlier than any other nation in Asia. The country preserved its independence throughout. The Japan-Russia War gave encouragement to many people under colonial rule from Asia to Africa.

After World War I, which embroiled the world, the movement for self-determination gained momentum and put brakes on colonization that had been underway. It was a horrible war that claimed as many as ten million lives. With a strong desire for peacestirred in them, people founded the League of Nations and brought forth the General Treaty for Renunciation of War. There emerged in the international community a new tide of outlawing war itself.

At the beginning, Japan, too, kept steps with other nations. However, with the Great Depression setting in and the Western countries launching economic blocs by involving colonial economies, Japan’s economy suffered a major blow. In such circumstances, Japan’s sense of isolation deepened and it attempted to overcome its diplomatic and economic deadlock through the use of force. Its domestic political system could not serve as a brake to stop such attempts. In this way, Japan lost sight of the overall trends in the world.

With the Manchurian Incident, followed by the withdrawal from the League of Nations, Japan gradually transformed itself into a challenger to the new international order that the international community sought to establish after tremendous sacrifices. Japan took the wrong course and advanced along the road to war.

And, seventy years ago, Japan was defeated.

On the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, I bow my head deeply before the souls of all those who perished both at home and abroad. I express my feelings of profound grief and my eternal, sincere condolences.

More than three million of our compatriots lost their lives during the war: on the battlefields worrying about the future of their homeland and wishing for the happiness of their families; in remote foreign countries after the war, in extreme cold or heat, suffering from starvation and disease. The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the air raids on Tokyo and other cities, and the ground battles in Okinawa, among others, took a heavy toll among ordinary citizens without mercy.

Also in countries that fought against Japan, countless lives were lost among young people with promising futures. In China, Southeast Asia, the Pacific islands and elsewhere that became the battlefields, numerous innocent citizens suffered and fell victim to battles as well as hardships such as severe deprivation of food. We must never forget that there were women behind the battlefields whose honour and dignity were severely injured.

Upon the innocent people did our country inflict immeasurable damage and suffering. History is harsh. What is done cannot be undone. Each and every one of them had his or her life, dream, and beloved family. When I squarely contemplate this obvious fact, even now, I find myself speechless and my heart is rent with the utmost grief.

The peace we enjoy today exists only upon such precious sacrifices. And therein lies the origin of postwar Japan.

We must never again repeat the devastation of war.

Incident, aggression, war — we shall never again resort to any form of the threat or use of force as a means of settling international disputes. We shall abandon colonial rule forever and respect the right of self-determination of all peoples throughout the world.

With deep repentance for the war, Japan made that pledge. Upon it, we have created a free and democratic country, abided by the rule of law, and consistently upheld that pledge never to wage a war again. While taking silent pride in the path we have walked as a peace-loving nation for as long as seventy years, we remain determined never to deviate from this steadfast course.

Japan has repeatedly expressed the feelings of deep remorse and heartfelt apology for its actions during the war. In order to manifest such feelings through concrete actions, we have engraved in our hearts the histories of suffering of the people in Asia as our neighbours: those in Southeast Asian countries such as Indonesia and the Philippines, and Taiwan, the Republic of Korea and China, among others; and we have consistently devoted ourselves to the peace and prosperity of the region since the end of the war.

Such position articulated by the previous cabinets will remain unshakable into the future.

However, no matter what kind of efforts we may make, the sorrows of those who lost their family members and the painful memories of those who underwent immense sufferings by the destruction of war will never be healed.

Thus, we must take to heart the following.

The fact that more than six million Japanese repatriates managed to come home safely after the war from various parts of the Asia-Pacific and became the driving force behind Japan’s postwar reconstruction; the fact that nearly three thousand Japanese children left behind in China were able to grow up there and set foot on the soil of their homeland again; and the fact that former POWs of the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Australia and other nations have visited Japan for many years to continue praying for the souls of the war dead on both sides.

How much emotional struggle must have existed and what great efforts must have been necessary for the Chinese people who underwent all the sufferings of the war and for the former POWs who experienced unbearable sufferings caused by the Japanese military in order for them to be so tolerant nevertheless?

That is what we must turn our thoughts to reflect upon.

Thanks to such manifestation of tolerance, Japan was able to return to the international community in the postwar era. Taking this opportunity of the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, Japan would like to express its heartfelt gratitude to all the nations and all the people who made every effort for reconciliation.

In Japan, the postwar generations now exceed eighty per cent of its population. We must not let our children, grandchildren, and even further generations to come, who have nothing to do with that war, be predestined to apologize. Still, even so, we Japanese, across generations, must squarely face the history of the past. We have the responsibility to inherit the past, in all humbleness, and pass it on to the future.

Our parents’ and grandparents’ generations were able to survive in a devastated land in sheer poverty after the war. The future they brought about is the one our current generation inherited and the one we will hand down to the next generation. Together with the tireless efforts of our predecessors, this has only been possible through the goodwill and assistance extended to us that transcended hatred by a truly large number of countries, such as the United States, Australia, and European nations, which Japan had fiercely fought against as enemies.

We must pass this down from generation to generation into the future. We have the great responsibility to take the lessons of history deeply into our hearts, to carve out a better future, and to make all possible efforts for the peace and prosperity of Asia and the world.

We will engrave in our hearts the past, when Japan attempted to break its deadlock with force. Upon this reflection, Japan will continue to firmly uphold the principle that any disputes must be settled peacefully and diplomatically based on the respect for the rule of law and not through the use of force, and to reach out to other countries in the world to do the same. As the only country to have ever suffered the devastation of atomic bombings during war, Japan will fulfill its responsibility in the international community, aiming at the non-proliferation and ultimate abolition of nuclear weapons.

We will engrave in our hearts the past, when the dignity and honour of many women were severely injured during wars in the 20th century. Upon this reflection, Japan wishes to be a country always at the side of such women’s injured hearts. Japan will lead the world in making the 21st century an era in which women’s human rights are not infringed upon.

We will engrave in our hearts the past, when forming economic blocs made the seeds of conflict thrive. Upon this reflection, Japan will continue to develop a free, fair and open international economic system that will not be influenced by the arbitrary intentions of any nation. We will strengthen assistance for developing countries, and lead the world toward further prosperity. Prosperity is the very foundation for peace. Japan will make even greater efforts to fight against poverty, which also serves as a hotbed of violence, and to provide opportunities for medical services, education, and self-reliance to all the people in the world.

We will engrave in our hearts the past, when Japan ended up becoming a challenger to the international order. Upon this reflection, Japan will firmly uphold basic values such as freedom, democracy, and human rights as unyielding values and, by working hand in hand with countries that share such values, hoist the flag of “Proactive Contribution to Peace,” and contribute to the peace and prosperity of the world more than ever before.

Heading toward the 80th, the 90th and the centennial anniversary of the end of the war, we are determined to create such a Japan together with the Japanese people.

August 14, 2015
Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister of Japan

001

Mr. Peachman and author, at debut book signing, Aug. 8, 2015. Mary Rozell photo.

As the book  ‘The Things Our Fathers Saw ‘ went to press, I was contacted by the Japan’s largest news wire service, “with over 50 million subscribers worldwide, publishing articles in Japanese, English, Chinese and in Korean…” They wanted a veteran’s “reflections as we approach the 70th anniversary of the double bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki” (which he offers in the book, Chapter 13, ‘The Kamikazes’). So, seventy years after the war, Mr. Peachman got to address the Japanese people. The story is below. I called him to ask him how it went.

Mr. Peachman: “It was very nice, the reporter was happy to speak to me. I told her, ‘I hope you have an hour or two.’ We had many things in common- I had traveled to Japan several times after the war, and we knew of the same places. I told her, you can’t say that you feel the same as you did, 70 years later. During World War II, the Japanese would fight to the death. I honestly felt that the bomb was necessary to end the war, though I feel that President Roosevelt made a mistake by demanding unconditional surrender. And I have questions about how and when the bomb was used. But make no mistake, the coming land invasion of Japan would have been a bloodbath.”

Mr. Peachman and author, at debut book signing, Aug. 8, 2015. Article in Japanese in foreground. Mary Rozell photo.

Mr. Peachman and author, at debut book signing, Aug. 8, 2015. Article in Japanese in foreground. Mary Rozell photo.

NEXT LOCAL AUTHOR APPEARANCE/EVENT:
• BOOK SIGNING AND TALK-Sunday, August 23, 7:00 pm:
The Glen at Hiland Meadows, 39 Longview Drive, Queensbury, NY 12804

From the Kyodo Japanese News Service :
Thank you so very much for all of your help and for putting us in touch with Mr. Peachman. As I explained to you both it was part of a series of short interviews conducted with people from around the world on the subject of views on the atomic bomb.
In addition to Mr. Peachman, whose comments we wrote about, we also spoke with a third generation Japanese American in LA, a former factory worker in Beijing, a female university student in Seoul, a high school teacher in Hong Kong who was involved in the protest movements, a former office worker in Germany, a Professor Emeritus from Israel, a young Iranian whose parent was a writer and a former preacher from Scotland.
We are so appreciative of our conversation with Mr. Peachman and because of the importance of what he said, he was mentioned at the top. Please see the Japanese article with the mark indicating the part where he spoke.
In Summary: we simply explained that many in the U.S. believe that the atomic bomb was necessary to help save lives and that Mr. Peachman was aboard a ship off Okinawa when it was attacked by Kamikaze planes. He lost some of his crew mates and upon hearing the news that the bomb was dropped was relieved because he did not think that he would have survived another encounter with the Japanese. Although he is saddened by the deaths that occurred in Hiroshima he did believe that it did save lives.
I hope this is helpful to you and please pass along our appreciation to Mr. Peachman and we also thank you so much for putting us in touch with him.
Please see the attached file.
Best regards,
S. M.

*************************************************************

Matthew Rozell’s career as a history teacher is now spanning four decades. Over the course of the past 20 years, he and his students conducted hundreds of interviews with the World War II generation. One such interview led to the reuniting of a train transport of Holocaust survivors with their American liberators, over 60 years later. He is currently working on a trilogy of narrative histories based on these interviews.

His first book, a narrative of World War II in the Pacific as told through the previously unpublished recollections of over 30 veterans, was released in August. It is available here.  His second book, in progress, is on the power of  teaching, remembering the Holocaust, and the real story behind the  iconic photo of the “Train Near Magdeburg’. He can be reached at his Facebook page at Author Matthew Rozell or by commenting below.

How my 93 yr. old history teacher, who survived a deadly kamikaze attack in the spring of 1945, got to address the Japanese people on the eve of the 70th anniversary of the end of WW II.

Mr. Alvin Peachman, Nov. 2014, out for his daily walk. Photo by Mike Nicholson, HFHS Class of 1979.

Mr. Alvin Peachman, Nov. 2014, out for his daily walk. Photo by Mike Nicholson, HFHS Class of 1979.

Be sure to come out and see us at the first author event- yes, Mr. Peachman will be there, too. He has TWO chapters in the book.

August 8th, 1-4 pm
The Village Booksmith.
223 Main St, Hudson Falls, NY 12839
(518) 747-3261

As the book  ‘The Things Our Fathers Saw ‘ went to press, I was contacted by the Japan’s largest news wire service, “with over 50 million subscribers worldwide, publishing articles in Japanese, English, Chinese and in Korean…” They wanted a veteran’s “reflections as we approach the 70th anniversary of the double bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki” (which he offers in the book, Chapter 13, ‘The Kamikazes’). So, seventy years after the war, Mr. Peachman got to address the Japanese people. The story is not out yet, but I just called him to ask him how it went.

Mr. Peachman: “It was very nice, the reporter was happy to speak to me. I told her, ‘I hope you have an hour or two.’ We had many things in common- I had traveled to Japan several times after the war, and we knew of the same places. I told her, you can’t say that you feel the same as you did, 70 years later. During World War II, the Japanese would fight to the death. I honestly felt that the bomb was necessary to end the war, though I feel that President Roosevelt made a mistake by demanding unconditional surrender. And I have questions about how and when the bomb was used. But make no mistake, the coming land invasion of Japan would have been a bloodbath.”

From the book:

 ‘I Lost Many Friends’


Matthew Rozell: So what did you think about the atomic bomb?

Best thing that ever happened to us. If it wouldn’t have been for the atomic bomb, I think we would have had a catastrophic amount of men killed, and probably the elimination of the Japanese nation as a whole. It would have been a terrible thing to conquer. I think it did a great deal in helping to save a million or two men, as well as the Japanese. I believe Harry Truman was a wonderful president in that regard; he really did a great favor to us. But I do not understand why we had to wait so long to figure things out! We shouldn’t have gone into Okinawa if we knew we had the atomic bomb because in Okinawa, we had 50,000 casualties! Our whole division was hit, except for the Wilmarth, as I told you. Two hundred and fifty ships were hit at Okinawa by kamikazes. The day we got hit, 26 ships got hit, and six were sunk to the bottom! I believe the Japanese had over 500 aircraft against us that day, suicide aircraft. Have you ever been startled by a partridge suddenly trying to fly into you? It is really a scary thing! Although you weren’t thinking of it at the time, it was a scary thing that these people would give up their lives like that. It was the most Navy lives lost in one battle. I lost many friends.

Destroyer Escort USS WITTER undergoing repairs following kamikaze attack. Alvin Peachman collection.

Destroyer Escort USS WITTER undergoing repairs
following kamikaze attack. Alvin Peachman collection.

As the land battle for Okinawa raged toward its crescendo with the fury of a storm, the kamikaze attacks would claim over 15,000 American casualties for the Navy alone.

cover-shrunkThe paperback book is ready. It’s reasonably priced and it can be ordered at Amazon. The e-book is also there; below are some still shots/previews.

Thank you for all your support in keeping the memory alive.

 

 ORDER THE PAPERBACK BOOK  / E-BOOK HERE.

288 pages. 35 photographs, including never-before published portraits, and over a dozen maps/closeups by Susan Winchell-Sweeney.

Receive regular updates by ‘liking’ the Facebook page at the bottom of our HOME page or visiting it at  AuthorMatthewRozell

The first author appearance is scheduled in Hudson Falls, NY, one of the book’s settings,  for August 8th , 1-4pm, at the Village Booksmith.

Address: 223 Main St, Hudson Falls, NY 12839
Phone:(518) 747-3261

RANDOM PREVIEW IN E-BOOK I-PAD VIEW.

 

This is kind of a quiet big deal. There is a boy from Hudson Falls, New York, and he and 387 others are buried here in commingled settings at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii. Exhumations began last week and are going on right now. He was 19 when he died, his remains were under water for 18 months, and he never came home. Definitely the first boy killed in World War II from our town, and county, maybe even the state. He left school at 17 and joined the Navy. A year later, he was declared missing, and he has never properly been identified.

Imagine what that did to his mother and father, and sister. He’s a big part of my upcoming book, which will be published this week.  Looks like I have to go back and add another endnote! But a good one.

Photo by Bruce and Debbie Almeida.

Photo by Bruce and Debbie Almeida.

From NPR: Pentagon To Exhume Remains Of Sailors From USS Oklahoma
APRIL 15, 201512:39 PM ET
KRISHNADEV CALAMUR

The Pentagon says it will exhume the remains of 388 sailors and Marines who died on Dec. 7, 1941, in the capsizing of the USS Oklahoma during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

They are all currently buried as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. In all, 429 sailors and Marines perished aboard the Oklahoma; 35 were identified in the years after the attack. The 388 personnel who remained unidentified were buried in 61 caskets at 45 grave sites at the memorial, locally dubbed the “Punchbowl.”

As recently as last year, the Navy told families of those aboard the ship that it opposed the exhumation, noting “a full DNA testing and accounting could take many years and likely leave many of the missing still unaccounted for.” But on Tuesday, the Pentagon reversed course.

Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work, in a memorandum, said: “Recent advances in forensic science and technology, as well as family member assistance in providing genealogical information, have now made it possible to make individual identifications for many Service members long-buried in graves marked ‘unknown.’ ”

The memorandum states that the Defense Department “has contacted families, collected and analyzed DNA from 84 percent of applicable USS Oklahoma family members, and has collected 90 percent of antemortem medical and dental records from the ship’s crew.” Analysis of the evidence suggests that most of the Oklahoma’s crew members could be identified if the 61 caskets were disinterred — a process, the memo said, that should be completed within five years.

More broadly, Work established a broader policy that applies to all unidentified human remains from permanent U.S. military cemeteries from which remains are exhumed for identification. For commingled remains, there must be a 60 percent chance of identification; for individuals, 50 percent.

Moss St. Cemetery. Photo by Judith Yole Graham.

Moss St. Cemetery. Photo by Judith Yole Graham. He is not here.

 

source article: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/04/15/399825301/pentagon-to-exhume-remains-of-sailors-aboard-uss-oklahoma

Further reading, update: http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/pentagon/2015/07/27/uss-oklahoma-remains-dug-up-for-identification/30750103/

Photo by Bruce and Debbie Almeida.

Photo by Bruce and Debbie Almeida.

Photo by Bruce and Debbie Almeida.

Photo by Bruce and Debbie Almeida.

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